Friday, 20 January 2012

Blog topics for the future...

Quick question for you all - I am going to do some more on medio-lateral balance for the blog for next week to answer Jen's comment from yesterday, plus a post on wall deviations and limb stability, plus a post on peripheral loading.

Someone else has emailed me a question about hoof boots and wraps, so that will also go on the list for future, and Amanda has asked about wall ripples.

Are there other topics you want to see discussed? If so, get your requests in here :-)

12 comments:

amandap said...

Are you sure this is a good idea? lol

Thin soles, causes, dangers and how to grow thicker ones is another question at the fore front of my mind.

I second hoof pads, boots and wraps and will stop there or I'll take over.

juliette said...

I am super interested in your track system layout. I reread all your track posts and love them. Our terrain is a little different than yours (sadly - Pennsylvania, not lovely Exmoor), and I do have Jaime Jackson's Paddock Paradise book, but I am looking to tighten up our pasture system and possible add more tracks and pea gravel.

You photos of the track and map help a lot. I am looking for specific dimensions. For example, I think you have 60 acres. How much is track? How much is used for horses turnout vs. bridle paths. I have 40 acres and no adjoining riding trails. I don't obviously want to ride in their track system. I want my boys to have a diverse and exciting life on track. Their feet are good now, but I worry about their minds. I ride everyday, but the day is long and I hope to make their pasture life diverse. Any suggestions?

jenj said...

All those topics sound great! Thanks so much for taking requests.

Barbara said...

I know that you are totally committed to barefoot, but for some of us it is just not possible for a competitive horse (6,000 ft, hard rocky ground, low oxygen etc). What are your opinions on giving horses a break from shoes for a few months at a time? My farrier and I agree that sometimes it is wonderful and sometimes it feels like a step back. What should you look for when deciding whether or not to do this?

Nic Barker said...

Wow! Thanks for the additional suggestions - should keep us quiet for a while!

Barbara - interesting comment about oxygen - not thought about that as limiting hoof function before, though I've known of a horse that had a hobday op develop a dramatic event line, presumably once it could breathe better. It had good feet before though...Food for thought!

amandap said...

jenj said...
"Thanks so much for taking requests."

Seconded and thank you so very much for taking the time to write your blog, it is so much appreciated by many of us and not least our horses. x

Wiola said...

And one from me: how to avoid softening of the hooves in wet weather/turn out and how problematic is it when little stones embed into the hoof?

Heila said...

How to best manage your barefoot horse under typical livery conditions.

Treating thrush.

How to talk so your vet and farrier will listen without feeling offended. LOL!

Feeding the good doer to avoid footiness.

The effect of obesity on feet.

Apologies if you've already written on some of these topics.

Nic Barker said...

OK, thank to everyone for their suggestions, including Anya and Cath who have also suggested:

- more on mismatched feet and what to do about it;
- how to take horses barefoot in a standard livery yard environment;
- what happens to hoof health if horses are shod before they are fully mature - can they ever produce a really good foot?

If there are any more topics, please add them as comments here, and I will try to get onto them soon!

cptrayes said...

Oh yes, the tieback was mine, wasn't he?? Jazz threw an event line big enough to hold a pencil when he could breathe again :-) I've seen a photo of another the same.

I'd like you to tell us more about the build-up of work the horses get, depending on their start point of course.

I know that your rehabs are never box rested, but neither do you have them in full work when lame, obviously!

C.

Sez said...

Myths about hooves.

Nic Barker said...

Sez, that one alone could keep us going for a while ;-)